Daniel Wick

“(Music) was definitely a coping mechanism; it gave me an outlet.”


You would never know that Daniel Wick has only been playing guitar for just over three years. As he stepped up to the stage at Bar Oussou open mic last Tuesday there was a sense in the audience that something special was about to happen. He has obviously been here before. He looks comfortable on stage as he begins to fingerpick his way through his first original song, ‘I’m not here to stay’.

“After a tragic break up, I had to write a couple of songs.”

 His fingerpicking style is Dylanesque, but his vocals are unique with an almost Jeff Buckley feel. He gets much of his inspiration from folk and folk rock and you feel this influence when listening to his songs.

“My holy trinity is Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, and Leonard Cohen.”

At the moment he is drawing a lot of inspiration from Brian Jonestown Massacre and he aspires to get a few musicians together to play a few bigger, more arranged pieces. At Bar Oussou, he often plays together with his friend Paul, who provides great accompaniment on the harmonica.

Wick, who works as an English and Media teacher at a local high school during the week, moved to Melbourne from Perth three years ago. Bar Oussou was the first place he played after he moved here, and he comes back almost every week. He enjoys the open mic scene around Brunswick, but also occasionally travels to Northcote and Richmond to perform there as well.

“Play open mics, all the time. It’s a really good way to get your confidence up and get your music heard.”

Wick also does a bit of slam poetry and finds inspiration from poets and stand-up comedians. In fact, he is currently working with a local poet to put one of their poems to his music.

Daniel Wick is a singer/songwriter with huge skill, great potential, and it’s definitely worth going to see him perform. You can listen to some of his demos on Soundcloud and find him on Facebook.

Kat Eddy

“I feel like maybe I’ve moved past crocodiles being an inspiration, you know?”


Kat Eddy stepped up to the microphone at Baxter’s Lot open mic last Thursday night and the room suddenly fell silent. As she played her way through a string of impressive original acoustic pop songs the audience were left in no doubt that they were witnessing something special. Those in attendance may have been surprised to learn that Kat had only begun playing open mics relatively recently, as a means to get her songs out of the bedroom and into the public domain.

 “I have a lot of songs – I wasn’t doing anything with them and wanted people to hear them.”

Kat has held a lifelong passion for music, having written her first song (about crocodiles) in grade five. Today her songs cover a wide variety of subjects and themes, ranging from the desire to be able to alter past mistakes (‘Start it Again’) to the challenges she and others have faced being a woman (‘Girl’, partially inspired by the plight of Pakistani human rights activist Malala Yousafzai).

“I don’t do very many love songs, which is weird – I’ve been told it’s not normal… I just sing about other things.”

While performing she appears relaxed and comfortable, gracefully laying her vocals over a bed of sophisticated, jazzy chord changes. She also possesses an unusually rhythmic playing style, going so far as to utilise the body of her guitar for percussive effect.

“I’m a perfectionist with arrangements – so I’ll write something but then it will take me ages to work out exactly how I want to play it… once it’s ready I stay with it.”

Drawing inspiration from a broad range of influences Kat cites Katie Tunstall, Sara Bareilles and Jamie Cullum as artists that have left a lasting impression on her.  Her goal is to record and release an EP sometime early next year, while pursuing regular paid gigs and continuing on the open mic circuit.

You can catch Kat playing at her two favourite open mics at The Snug (every Tuesday night) and Baxter’s Lot (first Thursday night of every month), and keep up with her music on her Facebook page.

The Cornish Arms

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“You get the opportunity to see some great acts and chat to people who love live music.”

Situated in the musical heart of Brunswick on Sydney road, The Cornish Arms have always supported local live music. Speaking on behalf of the venue, veteran barman Lachlan Lane explains that over the years, the venue has hosted music ranging from 70s soul/funk, local Melbourne grunge, DJs, blues, etc. but these days you’ll find more acoustic acts with afew rock bands thrown in the mix as well.

“The Cornish Arms was the place to go and get your music fix.”

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The venue complements its music reputation with a focus on good food. People come down for a good feed and stick around for the music acts. You can expect free live music on Fridays and Saturdays, including their Open Mic on Monday nights – a stage I’ve had the pleasure of playing on myself.

“Every Monday night [since 2009] there’s always been an Open Mic – I can’t remember a single Monday we haven’t hosted one.”

The Cornish Arms stage sees comedians, first-time music performers, travellers new to the area, etc. From a performer’s perspective it is a delight to play there – perfect amount of fold-back and a well-balanced sound for the audience.

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Many performers have gone on to bigger things such as ‘Busy Kingdom’ playing the Sydney Road & St Kilda festival in 2014, and even a 70s soul/funk band ‘Electric Empire’ playing the prestigious Glastonbury festival in 2011!

At the same time, the venue has played host to some… interesting acts. A notable one that Lachlan recalls was a musician who would plug his iPod in his ears and play along to songs that only he could hear in his headphones. All the crowd could hear was monotonous singing and 2 notes on the guitar over and over. Some comic relief though surely for the audience, but as Lachlan rightly states:

“Good on him for having a crack”

Musicians need to be sensitive about adapting their style for the venue or choosing venues with a crowd who appreciates their style.

“Here [Brunswick] you wouldn’t really put a cover band on.”

In closing, Lachlan expressed concern about Melbourne’s dwindling live music scene:

“It’s all about getting to the gigs. I know budget-wise it’s easy to get blind at home and then go to the gig, but it doesn’t support the pub. They’re spending money to put the band on.”

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